Flexible thinking

To be resilient requires flexible thinking and the ability to see different perspectives. Someone who is resilient can come up with a variety of reasons for being successful at something (multiple factors). Flexible thinking allows for multiple solutions to a problem. Being able to develop an alternative plan (‘Plan B’) is a vital aspect of resilience.


Year Level

7-10

Duration

60 minutes

Type

  • In class activity

SEL Competencies

  • Self-awareness
  • Social awareness
  • Relationship skills
  • Responsible decision-making

Learning Intention

  • Students can recognise that thinking flexibly and being able to listen to and accept other people's points of view is a key ingredient in developing resilience.

Key Outcomes

By the end of the lesson, students will understand that:

  • flexible thinking requires an ability to listen to other people’s opinions
  • having multiple solutions to a problem relieves pressure during tough times
  • having a Plan B is a core component of flexible thinking.

ACTIVITY 01

Class discussion: What is flexible thinking? 20 min

Ask students to think about the following questions:

  • What decisions have you had to make today?
  • What impacted on these decisions and your ultimate choices?
  • Were they hard decisions to make?
  • Did you have to change a plan (e.g. what to have for breakfast, or how you were going to get to school)?

Flexible thinking allows for multiple solutions to a problem. Being able to develop alternative plans (Plan Bs) is a vital aspect of resilience. Thinking flexibly and being able to listen to and accept other people’s points of view is a key ingredient in developing resilience.

Life is full of choices. Some decisions are easy to make, such as what to have for dinner; while others are more serious, such as which career to choose. Regardless of how important a decision is, good decision-making skills are useful in life, especially if you feel indecisive about something and it’s getting you down.