Talking to someone you trust can be a helpful source of support when dealing with an issue. In this lesson, students identify and explore some simple steps and strategies they can use to get the conversation started.

Year level

7-8

Duration

5 minutes

Type

In class activity

SEL Competencies

Self-management

Learning intention

Students recognise how talking to someone they trust can help them deal with challenges, and identify steps and strategies for making this happen.

Key outcomes

By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

  • recognise the importance of talking to someone they trust about a challenging issue

  • identify steps and strategies they could use to talk to someone they trust.

Materials needed

  • Access to the ReachOut article and infographic 5 steps to talking to someone you trust

  • Pens and paper

  • Students’ devices

Mapped to

Australian Curriculum: Health and Physical Education

  • Refine protective behaviours and evaluate community resources to seek help for themselves and others (AC9HP8P08)

Australian Curriculum: General Capabilities

  • Personal and Social Capability:

    • Self-management

NSW PDHPE Syllabus

  • Examines and demonstrates the role help-seeking strategies and behaviours play in supporting themselves and others (PD4-2)

Victorian Curriculum: Health and Physical Education

  • Develop skills to evaluate health information and express health concerns (VCHPEP129)

Show details

Activity 1

Instructions

5 minutes

  1. Explain to students that talking to someone they trust can be a helpful way to manage tough situations they might be dealing with. Using the ReachOut article 5 steps to talking to someone you trust, lead students through each step:

    • Decide who to talk to.

    • Work out what to say.

    • Time it right.

    • Decide how to have the conversation.

    • Don’t give up.

  2. Students trace an outline of their hand on a piece of paper and write on each finger a strategy they could use, or an action they could take, for each step if they wanted to talk to someone they trust about an issue: For example:

    • Decide who to talk to: 'I could talk to a good friend'.

    • Work out what to say: 'I could write down my thoughts beforehand'.

    • Time it right: 'I could plan a face-to-face chat over the weekend'.

    • Decide how to have the conversation: 'I could let them know I'm looking for someone to listen to me'.

    • Don’t give up: 'I could try talking to the school counsellor'.

Debrief: Talking to someone they trust can be a helpful way for young people to manage challenges, but sometimes they may not feel ready to talk. They could also learn more about self-care or even chat anonymously online on ReachOut’s Online Community.

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